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The Interfaith Education Fund (IEF) is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization that provides education, research, training and technical support to community organizations affiliated with the West / Southwest Industrial Areas Foundation.  Its focus is to equip ordinary people with the skills they need to be effective leaders in their workplace, in their congregations and in their communities. 

The Interfaith Education Fund provides education and training through:

Rooted in the tradition of the nation's oldest and largest organizing network, the Industrial Areas Foundation, the IEF has trained thousands of organizers and leaders across the West and Southwest US in the skills and practices of effective citizenship. We do so to ensure that ordinary citizens and residents know how to be more effective at making change in a proactive and positive manner, thereby recovering the nobility and virtue of public life.

Leaders and organizers trained by the Interfaith Education Fund have transformed local labor markets, changed public healthcare systems, turned around public schools, and renewed congregations seeking to be more effective in outreach and mission.     


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    Texas Catholic Herald: TMO Calls for Preferential Option for Single Mothers with Children

    [Excerpt] TMO is among the coalition of nonprofits that have approached the city and county to urge the equitable distribution of those funds. “We asked City Council to commit $100 million of the $404 million in the Coronavirus Relief Fund to rental assistance. But the next day, they committed $15 million that was distributed online in a matter of minutes to about 12,000 families,” Higgs said. “A survey shows of the 700,000 rental units in the area, up to 85,000 cannot pay rent at this time. A huge number of the people are service workers, men and women of color, hourly workers who lost their jobs with little if any savings. The need is so immense,” he said. With any moratoriums on evictions ending, justices of the peace may resume processing eviction notices by mid-June and constables will start showing up at apartments, he said. “It doesn’t make sense to evict someone who has paid regularly but is not able to currently pay during this crisis. Plus, when someone in uniform shows up to evict, it’s scary as heck, especially for those who may be undocumented,” Higgs said. [Photo Credit: Courtesy of St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church] Facing Eviction, Single Mothers With Kids Hit Hardest By Need For Rental Assistance, Texas Catholic Herald [pdf]
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    DAI Youth Leader Leans on Faith as He Organizes for Change

    [translated excerpts] With his parents out of work and without housing, a DREAMer lays his hope in God that DACA survives.... Until five weeks ago Ángel and Isabel worked helping out in a restaurant and cleaning houses, but they lost their jobs when the coronavirus crisis displaced them from work and they could no longer pay rent.  Their son Diego immediately offered to take them in.... "My parents have been my spiritual guides," said the youth who will be able to stay [in the US] as long he can renew his DACA permit in October.  "Now that my parents need me, I feel fortunate to have work and to be able to support them." ....in a virtual action organized by Dallas Area Interfaith (DAI), and co-hosted by Bishops Edward J. Burns and Greg Kelly, the priest of San Juan Diego [where Diego serves], Father Jesús Belmontes, described the situation of immigrant families in the face of the pandemic as "critical and sad."  One day after the action, the City Council of Dallas approved a measure that would allow 1 of the 7 millions of dollars that would go to rental relief to be directed to nonprofit organizations to help undocumented families pay their rent.                 A Dios Le Pido..., Revista Catolica [en español]
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